NECTARINES

ORIGIN OF NECTARINES

Nectarines date back to about 1 600AD when they were first named in English. The name Nectarine, is derived from the Greek word “Nektar” meaning “Drink of the Gods” in both Greek and Roman mythology.

Peaches and nectarines are classified in Latin as Prunus Persica, with the variants of “Nectarina” and “Persica”.

DID YOU KNOW?

South African Nectarines are in season from October to March

Grown mainly in the Western Cape – this area is one of the richest fruit growing regions in South Africa. Nectarines are also grown in the Northern provinces.

Peaches and nectarines

Total nectarine production: Approximately 30000 Tonnes
Nectarine exports: 9352 Tonnes
On-farm employment: 2541 labourers
10165 dependants

PEACHES & NECTARINES: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

  • Peaches and nectarines are the same species, even though they are regarded commercially as different fruit
  • The major difference is that peaches have a fuzzy skin surface while nectarines have a smooth skin
  • As with peaches, nectarines can be white or yellow, clingstone or freestone
  • On average, nectarines are slightly smaller and sweeter than peaches

A CHOICE OF GREAT FLAVOURS

CHOOSE YOUR FAVOURITE CULTIVAR

Nectarines can be white or yellow, clingstone or freestone with different flesh colouring. On average, nectarines are slightly smaller and sweeter than peaches

 MAYGLO: Skin bright red and flesh light yellow. Good taste but slightly acid.

 ALPINE: Bright red skin colour. Exceptional fruit appearance.

CRIMSON BLAZE: Bright red skin. Good fruit appearance, ideal for export

SPRING BRIGHT: A classic yellow flesh nectarine with a full red skin colour.

DONNARINE: Dark-red skin with yellow specs. Dark-yellow flesh with a good slightly acid taste.

FANTASIA: 75% Light red on a yellow background. Flesh bright yellow with a firm texture.

 AUGUST RED: Red on a green-yellow background. Good taste with a firm stringy texture.

FLAMEKIST: Red blush on a green-yellow background. Flesh is yellow with red around the stone cavity. Good firm texture.

WICKEDLY DELICIOUS IDEAS WITH PEACHES & NECTARINES

N
Combine sliced nectarines with sliced baby tomatoes. Top with sliced mozzarella and a few basil leaves. Drizzle with balsamic dressing.
N
Place halved nectarines in a baking dish. Mix 250ml flour, 160ml light brown sugar, 2ml cinnamon and 80ml melted butter. Mix to a crumble and scatter over nectarines. Bake at 180°C until soft, golden and crisp. Serve with cream or custard.
N
Brush nectarine quarters with a little oil and wrap in bacon. Secure with a toothpick. Grill in a pan until the bacon is cooked and golden on all sides. Drizzle with balsamic glaze and top with basil leaves.
N
Place halved nectarines in a baking dish. Fill the cavities with a teaspoon of butter and top with a tablespoon of soft brown sugar and a sprinkling of cinnamon. Bake 30 min at 180° C until soft and golden serve warm with cream.
N
Combine lettuce leaves, sliced nectarines, seedless grapes, sliced smoked chicken and avocado on a serving platter. Top with feta cheese and sprinkle with pecan nuts. Drizzle with honey mustard salad dressing.
N

Place halved yellow cling peaches in a baking dish. Fill the cavities with a teaspoon of butter and top with a tablespoon of soft brown sugar and a sprinkling of cinnamon. Bake 30 min at 180°C until soft and golden serve warm with cream.

N
Puree nectarines and mix with milk, double cream yoghurt and honey for a delicious smoothie.
N
Place thinly sliced nectarines and yellow cling peaches in a bowl. Spoon a thick layer of double cream yoghurt over. Sprinkle with a layer of soft brown sugar. Refrigerate for 1 hour and serve. Garnish with mint.

Nectarine tart tatin